conventional medicine examples

what is the extent of integration of cam and conventional medicine? the process will evolve further, and as the nation looks forward to a health care system in which conventional practice and cam coexist in close harmony, these processes will apply to new tests and treatments from both the traditions of practice. given these caveats, a more in-depth exploration of the conceptual model for translation from idea to practice is provided below. coverage policy is important to the adoption of new tests and treatments, although many patients pay out of pocket for cam services that payers do not cover. this conceptual model of how new ideas for interventions move into practice also applies to the integration of cam and conventional medical therapies, in which many cam therapies that are new to conventional medicine are being accepted by conventional medical practicioners or integrated into conventional practices. the center defines integrated therapies as “individual treatments that are used in addition to (or as a complement to) traditional cancer treatment such as chemotherapy and radiation” (dana-farber cancer institute, 2004). another survey by berman and colleagues (1998) found that almost 20 percent of the physicians had used in their practice 9 of the therapies listed in table 7-2 and that one-third or more were open to using 17 of them. (2003) evaluated nurses’ attitudes toward cam use in critical care and found that nurses are open to the use of cam therapies, with many already incorporating cam therapies into their own practices. it should be noted that not all cam practitioners are convinced that insurance coverage is positive for the future practice of complementary and alternative medicine.




some restrict the definition of “best care” to those therapies found in conventional medicine; however, the growing body of evidence demonstrating that some cam therapies are safe and effective is likely to be a factor contributing to the increased use of cam by both health care practitioners and health care institutions. … the difference corresponds roughly to the tradeoff in medical ethics between autonomy and paternalism.” integrative medicine may also be a response to the growing recognition of health professionals that many factors contribute to the health of individuals and the public. as discussed earlier in this chapter, the level of integration of conventional and cam therapies is growing. when a patient is referred to a cam provider, it is important for the conventional medical practitioners to inquire about the provider’s training, practice experience, scope of practice, and history of malpractice litigation or professional discipline. there are several approaches to the integration of cam and conventional medicine. the advantage of this model is that revenues are generated from both the cam practice and the primary-care medical practice. services are provided under one roof, and the team collaborates in the planning and provision of care. when the effectiveness of cam and conventional medical treatments is studied, it is unlikely that the results will show that all treatments in one modality are effective and that all treatments in the other are ineffective. to the extent that evidence indicates that models of health care that integrate cam and conventional therapies (e.g., integrative medicine clinics) offer patients benefits, more research on these benefits would be useful. note: the dotted lines between the different levels of the model denote interaction effects between and among the various levels of health determinants (worthman, 1999).

examples of cam include: traditional alternative medicine. this field includes the more mainstream and accepted forms of therapy, such as acupuncture, a system in which medical doctors and other healthcare professionals (such as nurses, pharmacists, and therapists) treat symptoms and diseases using drugs, examples include -in addition to homeopathy- massage, herbal remedies, exercise, lifestyle counseling, meditation, relaxation, acupuncture, and, alternative medicine examples, alternative medicine examples, conventional medicine – wikipedia, unconventional medicine examples, complementary medicine.

treatment that is widely accepted and used by most healthcare professionals. it is different from alternative or complementary therapies, which are not as widely used. examples of conventional treatment for cancer include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. also called conventional therapy. examples include -in addition to homeopathy- massage, herbal remedies, exercise, lifestyle counseling, meditation, relaxation, acupuncture, and art therapy. complementary medicine refers to therapies that complement traditional western (or allopathic) medicine and is used together with conventional medicine, and a distinct trend toward the integration of complementary and alternative medicine (cam) therapies with the practice of conventional medicine is occuring., conventional medicine benefits, complementary and alternative medicine, why alternative medicine is better, what are the 5 major types of complementary and alternative medicine, conventional medicine synonym, integrative medicine, disadvantages of conventional medicine, conventional medicine vs herbal medicine, non conventional medicine meaning, acupuncture.

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